10 thoughts on “Hemorrhoid Swelling Won’t Go Down

  1. What is wrong with my perineum/anus?
    I’m a 22-year-old female. I’ve never had an STD to my knowledge. I got tested for several a few months ago. Since, I have had a few new partners.

    This was just so sudden! The last time I had sex was Tuesday night. It was a new partner. The next day, my perineum hurt. I’ve experienced soreness or even tears there in the past after intercourse. I thought it was just that. It continued to be sore though, and just yesterday or the day before, I noticed it felt swollen. I looked at it and it is swollen down to my anus. There are a couple of red spots, and one spot that now easily bleeds. Today I looked at it, as it is a little more painful, and now there are a couple of somewhat faint red bumps around my anus, and they are painful. I was really hoping I had gotten a tear and it got infected, but with these two other bumps appearing, I am fearing an STD. I have white translucent discharge. The swollen area is warm and a little firm. It is a little itchy, especially after i have touched it. I don’t know of any other symptoms. I am not having sex but won’t be able to get into a doctor until Thursday, as I work doubles Monday-Wednesday. I’m a little concerned about waiting that long. This is pretty uncomfortable as it is.

    I’m really hoping that this is another unusual problem that is easily curable. God I don’t want herpes or anything of that nature. It’s funny, I was just starting to seriously consider celibacy.

    Any input? Thanks in advance to anyone who has something helpful and constructive to say. I know how awful some people can be on here.

  2. Is this a hemorrhoid or an abcess? or neither?
    I’ve had this little piece of skin on the outside of my anus for kind of a long time. It was just skin though, it wasn’t swollen, it never hurt or itched or caused any discomfort. I can’t say how long it’s been there, but it has been for a long time. I’d say maybe a year give or take. Recently though, it’s gotten swollen and it’s painful. It doesn’t itch however. Not at all. Before it got swollen, I would sometimes notice blood when I wiped after a BM, but never pain. My mom also had hemorrhoids at one point in her life if that helps with anything. I’m a bit scared because I’ve been reading around and I’ve seen some people say that abscesses require surgery, which I’m very terrified of. It’s also that time of the month, so I won’t be able to go to a doctor for a few days because I prefer to not give my doctor a nasty surprise, but would you recommend I see a doctor ASAP or should I wait and see if the swelling goes down or if this hemorrhoid cream I applied today helps? Also, I can say for sure that I have had constipation and hard stools in the past.

    • Hi

      Good that you noticed this problem early. It seems like its hemorrhoids. But it is not that deadly yet. That does not guarantee that it will never get serious in your life. So consult a doctor if you can. I would not go for a surgery. I had one of my friends with the same problem. He said after surgery it grows back with time. So what is the use of this hustle. Rather go for herbal treatment for it. Herbal treatments bring best results for problems like these.

    • 1. Establish whether or not this condition runs in the family. Dark circles in particular are believed to frequently be hereditary. This doesn’t mean that you can’t do anything about the conditions, but you should be prepared for minimal success actually trying to get rid of them. Dark circles under the eye may also, in fact, be light carbon deposits that result from incomplete protein digestion.

      2. Identify allergens. Allergies may be the most common cause of skin discoloration and puffiness under the eyes.

      3. Get plenty of sleep nightly. It’s not entirely clear why inadequate sleep results in dark circles under the eyes, but we’ve all seen it happen either to ourselves or someone we know. For one thing, lack of sleep tends to cause the skin to become paler and it reduces circulation. It’s also believed that too little time lying down is a cause in itself. Determine how much sleep you need (it’s usually 7-9 hours per night) and try to get that amount regularly for a couple of weeks to see if that helps.
      Remember that alcohol and drugs can adversely affect the quality of your sleep; abstain from these products or use only in moderation for best results.

      4. Treat your skin while you sleep. There are overnight facial masques available that may help reduce the appearance of puffiness or discoloration, but you can also make your own. Just before you go to bed, take a washcloth and wet it just a bit with cold water. Then squeeze out any excess water and place it over your eyes as you sleep. Treating your skin may help, but the real problem may also be that you have a poor vitamin and mineral absorption problem that must also be corrected.

      5. Apply cool tea bags, an ice cube wrapped in soft cloth, or cucumber slices to your eyes daily. The tannin in tea bags has been shown to reduce swelling and discoloration, and cucumber slices have long been used to reduce puffiness and refresh the appearance of skin around the eyes. Lie down, preferably in the morning, and leave fresh cucumber slices or cool, damp caffeinated tea bags (you can refrigerate them overnight so they’ll be ready) over your eyes for about 10-15 minutes. Keep your eyes closed.

      6. Wash your face with cool to somewhat cold water in the morning or when puffiness occurs. The cold water will cause blood vessels to constrict, and thus reduces swelling.

      7. Try to relax the space. You can do this by wetting a cotton swab and then freezing it for a little while. Then you should gently wipe under your eyes in the areas where the circles are occurring. When wiping, close your eyes and try not to flinch.

      8. Apply an eye cream containing vitamin K and retinol. Dark circles may be caused by a deficiency of vitamin K. Regardless of the cause, however, recent research has shown that skin creams containing these two ingredients reduce puffiness and discoloration significantly in many patients. Long-term daily use seems to have the greatest effect.

      9. Avoid rubbing your eyes. Usually rubbing of the eyes is brought on by allergies, but not always. Regardless of the reason, stop doing it. The rubbing irritates the skin and can break tiny capillaries beneath the skin, causing both puffiness and discoloration.

      10. Eat a healthy, balanced diet and drink plenty of water. A whole host of cosmetic problems can be attributed to vitamin deficiencies.

      11. Reduce salt intake. Excess salt causes the body to retain water in unusual places, and this can result in puffiness under the eyes. Too much salt can also impair your circulation, and cause the blood vessels under the skin to appear bluer.

      12. Quit smoking.

      13. Cover the problem up with cosmetics. If all else fails, use a yellow or flesh-toned color which will camouflage the problem.

      14. To do away with the unsightly swelling, use a little Preparation H or hemorrhoid cream. Just be careful not to put it too close to your eyes. It will shrink the skin if it is swollen, but won’t make the dark circles go away.

      15. Cutting onions will help you cry out some of the moisture under and around your eyes. However it isn’t recommended you carry out this procedure daily. This will reduce the darkness under the eyes somewhat. Using tea bags under your eyes straight afterwards also helps. Puffiness may not reduce immediately but will shortly afterwards.

      16. Put 2 tablespoons in the freezer for few minutes and apply on the eyes for few seconds, until they are warm. Re-apply if necessary.

  3. If anyone has any other serious input?
    I thought that hemorroids went away, I didnt know they didnt. I have had two kids and had hem. when I delivered, but anyway For about the ast year and half I have had bowel movements with red in it, and My mom told me she does same thing and its her hemorroids too, was just very concerned i got scared.

    • Brandy B,
      I gave part of this answer recently to a similar question and I repeat it here for your interest – Piles, or haemorrhoids, are swellings on the inside of the anal canal, the short, muscular tube that connects the rectum (back passage) with the anus, in areas known as the anal cushions. They are round swellings that can reach the size of a grape. Piles are not varicose veins. Although piles develop from inside the anal canal, they can hang down out of their normal place. Piles can be described as follows. They are classified by four types – First degree piles are swellings on the inside lining of the anal canal. They bleed but can’t be seen from outside the anus. Second degree piles are larger and stick out (or prolapse) from the anus when you open your bowels, but return on their own afterwards. Third degree piles are similar, but hang out from the anus and only return inside when pushed back in. Fourth degree piles permanently hang down from the anus and you can’t push them back inside. They may become extremely swollen and painful if the blood in them clots. Common symptoms of heamorrhoids include – Bright red blood from your anus, which you may notice on the toilet paper when wiping, or in the toilet bowl. A lump on the anus. Pain and discomfort after you have opened your bowels. A slimy discharge of mucus, which may cause itching. A feeling that your bowels haven’t emptied completely. Soiling underwear (with third or fourth degree piles). Bright red blood from the anus is most likely to come from piles, rather than anything more serious. However, if you are unsure whether the bleeding is due to piles, you should visit your doctor for advice. The exact cause of piles isn’t known. One theory is that it’s due to weakness of the tissue that connects the anal cushions to the muscle layers underneath. Also, as humans adopt the upright position, gravity obviously plays a part. Due to this weakness, the anal cushions slide out of their normal place and down the anal canal. If you have daily bowel movements that are solid but soft, and you don’t need to strain, faeces will pass easily and will not put pressure on the blood vessels in your anal area. To keep your bowel movements soft, you should eat plenty of fibre-rich foods such as fruit, vegetables and wholegrain cereals (eg brown rice, wholemeal bread and wholemeal pasta) and drink plenty of water. There are a number of over-the-counter treatments that can help relieve the symptoms of piles, but won’t cure them. Always read the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine and ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. – MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      I add a link with details of this subject

      http://en.wikipedia.org/
      wiki/Hemorrhoid

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  4. how do i get dark circles from around my eyes with coco butter?
    i am 13 and no one likes me because i have these circles around my eyes and its hard for me because people pick on me its not my fought i had them since i was born some one help me please and i dont have the money to buy any treatments some fine me something really cheap please

    • Here’s some tips I found on the internet, I hope this helps =)

      1) Get plenty of sleep nightly. It’s not entirely clear why inadequate sleep results in dark circles under the eyes, but we’ve all seen it happen either to ourselves or someone we know. For one thing, lack of sleep tends to cause the skin to become paler (thus increasing the appearance of darkness under the eyes), and it reduces circulation. It’s also believed that too little time lying down is a cause in itself. Determine how much sleep you need (it’s usually 7-9 hours per night) and try to get that amount regularly for a couple of weeks to see if that helps. Remember that alcohol and drugs can adversely affect the quality of your sleep; abstain from these products or use only in moderation for best results.
      2) Treat your skin while you sleep. There are overnight facial masques available that may help reduce the appearance of puffiness or discoloration, but you can also make your own. Just before you go to bed, take a washcloth and wet it just a bit with cold water. Then squeeze out any excess water and place it over your eyes as you sleep.
      3) Apply cool tea bags, an ice cube wrapped in soft cloth, or cucumber slices to your eyes daily. The tannin in tea bags has been shown to reduce swelling and discoloration, and cucumber slices have long been used to reduce puffiness and refresh the appearance of skin around the eyes. Lie down, preferably in the morning, and leave fresh cucumber slices or cool, damp caffeinated tea bags (you can refrigerate them overnight so they’ll be ready) over your eyes for about 10-15 minutes. Keep your eyes closed.
      4) Wash your face with cool to somewhat cold water in the morning or when puffiness occurs. The cold water will cause blood vessels to constrict, and thus reduces swelling.
      5) Try to relax the space. You can do this by wetting a cotton swab and then freezing it for a little while. Then you should gently wipe under your eyes in the areas where the circles are occurring. When wiping, close your eyes and try not to flinch.
      6) Apply an eye cream containing vitamin K and retinol. Dark circles may be caused by a deficiency of vitamin K. Regardless of the cause, however, recent research has shown that skin creams containing these two ingredients reduce puffiness and discoloration significantly in many patients. Long-term daily use seems to have the greatest effect.
      7) Avoid rubbing your eyes. Usually rubbing of the eyes is brought on by allergies, but not always. Regardless of the reason, stop doing it. The rubbing irritates the skin and can break tiny capillaries beneath the skin, causing both puffiness and discoloration.
      8) Eat a healthy, balanced diet and drink plenty of water. A whole host of cosmetic problems can be attributed to vitamin deficiencies. Dark circles and puffiness are often attributed to lack of vitamin K or inadequate antioxidants. Be sure to get plenty of fruits and vegetables—especially cabbage, spinach, and other leafy green vegetables—and take a daily vitamin supplement if necessary. Get adequate fluids to improve circulation.
      9) Reduce salt intake. Excess salt causes the body to retain water in unusual places, and this can result in puffiness under the eyes. Too much salt can also impair your circulation, and cause the blood vessels under the skin to appear bluer.
      10) Cover the problem up with cosmetics. If all else fails, use a yellow or flesh-toned color which will camouflage the problem.
      11) To do away with the unsightly swelling, use a little Preparation H or hemorrhoid cream. Just be careful not to put it too close to your eyes. It will shrink the skin if it is swollen, but won’t make the dark circles go away.
      12) Cutting onions will help you cry out some of the moisture under and around your eyes , however it isn’t recommended you carry out this procedure daily .This will reduce the darkness under the eyes somehow . Using tea bags under your eyes straight afterwards also helps . Puffiness may not reduce immediately but will shortly afterwards

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